PRIMATE PSYCHOLOGY

A primate (L. prima, first) is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all the species commonly related to the lemurs, monkeys, and apes, with the latter category including humans. The English singular primate is a back-formation from the Latin name Primates, which itself was the plural of the Latin primas ("one of the first, excellent, noble"). Primates are found all over the world. Non-human primates occur mostly in Central and South America, Africa, and southern Asia. A few species exist as far north in the Americas as southern Mexico, and as far north in Asia as northern Japan.
All primates have five fingers, a generalized dental pattern, and a primitive body plan. Another distinguishing feature of primates is fingernails. Opposing thumbs are also a characteristic primate feature, but are not limited to this order. In primates, the combination of opposing thumbs, short fingernails (rather than claws) and long, inward-closing fingers is a relic of the ancestral practice of gripping branches, and has, in part, allowed some species to develop brachiation as a significant means of transportation. Forward-facing color binocular vision was also useful for the brachiating ancestors of humans, particularly for finding and collecting food, although recent studies suggest it was more useful in courtship. All primates, even those that lack the features typical of other primates (like lorises), share eye orbit characteristics, such as a postorbital bar, that distinguish them from other taxonomic orders. Old World species (apes and some monkeys) tend to have significant sexual dimorphism. This is characterized most in size difference, with males being up to a bit more than twice as heavy as females. This dimorphism is a result of a polygynous mating system where there is significant pressure to attract and defend multiple mates. New World species form pair bonds, and so these species (including tamarins and marmosets) generally do not show a significant size difference between the sexes.

All primates have five fingers (pentadactyly), a generalized dental pattern, and a primitive (unspecialized) body plan. Another distinguishing feature of primates is fingernails. Opposing thumbs are also a characteristic primate feature, but are not limited to this order. In primates, the combination of opposing thumbs, short fingernails (rather than claws) and long, inward-closing fingers is a relic of the ancestral practice of gripping branches, and has, in part, allowed some species to develop brachiation as a significant means of transportation. Forward-facing color binocular vision was also useful for the brachiating ancestors of humans, particularly for finding and collecting food, although recent studies suggest it was more useful in courtship. All primates, even those that lack the features typical of other primates (like lorises), share eye orbit characteristics, such as a postorbital bar, that distinguish them from other taxonomic orders. Old World species (apes and some monkeys) tend to have significant sexual dimorphism. This is characterized most in size difference, with males being up to a bit more than twice as heavy as females. This dimorphism is a result of a polygynous mating system where there is significant pressure to attract and defend multiple mates. New World species form pair bonds, and so these species (including tamarins and marmosets) generally do not show a significant size difference between the sexes.

In more ways than we may sometimes care to acknowledge, the human being is just another primate-it is certainly only very rarely that researchers into cognition, emotion, personality, and behavior in our species and in other primates come together to compare notes and share insights.

Relying on theories of behavior derived from psychology rather than ecology or biological anthropology, the authors, internationally known experts in primatology and psychology, focus primarily on social processes in areas including aggression, conflict resolution, sexuality, attachment, parenting, social development and affiliation, cognitive development, social cognition, personality, emotions, vocal and nonvocal communication, cognitive neuroscience, and psychopathology. They show nonhuman primates to be far more complex, cognitively and emotionally, than was once supposed, with provocative implications for our understanding of supposedly unique human characteristics. Arguing that both human and nonhuman primates are distinctive for their wide range of context-sensitive behaviors, their work makes a powerful case for the future integration of human and primate behavioral research.


Vision for how you live
Primate Psychology image -2
Primate Psychology image -3
Primate Psychology image -1
Home


Custom Search
A l l   R i g h t s   R e s e r v e d  ® Psychologybd.com  or  its affiliates
About psychologybd.com: psychologybd.com is a psychology and psychological related site and Vision for how you live.

Psychology has now expanded its scope to the point where it studies virtually every question about human behavior you can possibly imagine and then some. Psychologybd covers all aspects of human behavior to explore such concepts as perception, cognition, attention, emotion, phenomenology, motivation, brain functioning, personality, behavior, memory, online psychology, interpersonal relationships, concrete shape to feelings and it is approached scientifically, the concept of concentration, attentiveness etc. Any one can contribute their thoughts and ideas at psychologybd.

Psychologybd.com and Everyday Life
Psychology today, Articles, News-Events, BPA activities, SAAP activities, Abstracts, Psychology basic, Abnormal Psychology, Adaptation Psychology, Adulthood PsychologyAutism Psychology, Biological Psychology, Childhood Psychology, Climate Change Psychology, Clinical Psychology, Color Psychology, Communication Psychology, Counselling Psychology, Education Psychology, Energy Psychology, Evolutionary Psychology, Exploring Psychology, Forensic Psychology, General Psychology, Golden age Psychology, Growth Psychology, Health Psychology, Industrial Psychology, Human psychology, Interior Design Psychology, Learning Psychology, Lifespan Developmental Psychology, Living Psychology, Love psychology, Media Psychology, Pediatric Psychology, Photographic Psychology, Physiological psychology, Primate Psychology, Psychedelic Psychology, Psychology of Art, Psychology in ICT, Psychology of Leadership, Psychology of Music, Psychology of recycling, Social Psychology, Sports Psychology, Time Psychology .